Educating about Different Mental Health Disorders

People can experience different types of mental health problems. These problems can affect your thinking, mood,
and behavior. Many symptoms of mental health disorders are common. The symptoms can add up to the level of a
disorder if these symptoms are more severe and/or long-lasting and affect your functioning.
Only a medical or behavioral health provider can diagnose someone.

Educating about Different Mental Health Disorders

People can experience different types of mental health problems. These problems can affect your thinking, mood, and behavior. Many symptoms of mental health disorders are common. The symptoms can add up to the level of a disorder if these symptoms are more severe and/or long-lasting and affect your functioning. Only a medical or behavioral health provider can diagnose someone.

Anxiety Disorders

Occasional anxiety is an expected part of life. You might feel anxious when faced with a problem at work, before taking a test, or before making an important decision. But anxiety disorders involve more than temporary worry or fear. For a person with an anxiety disorder, the anxiety does not go away and can get worse over time. The symptoms can interfere with daily activities such as job performance, schoolwork, and relationships.
There are several types of anxiety disorders, including:

  • Panic Disorder and Phobias
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders involve extreme emotions, attitudes, and behaviors involving weight and food. There are several types of eating disorders, including:

  • Anorexia Nervosa
  • Binge Eating
  • Bulimia

Mood Disorders

These disorders, also called affective disorders, may involve:

  • Feeling sad all the time
  • Losing interest in important parts of life
  • Fluctuating between extreme happiness and extreme sadness

The most common mood disorders are:

  • Depression
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
  • Self-Harm

Personality Disorders

People with personality disorders experience patterns of behavior, feelings, and thinking that can:

  • Interfere with a person’s life
  • Create problems at work and school
  • Cause issues in personal and social relationships

There are several types of personality disorders, including:

  • Antisocial Personality Disorder
  • Borderline Personality Disorder

Psychotic Disorders

People with psychotic disorders lose contact with reality and experience a range of extreme symptoms that usually includes:

  • Hallucinations—hearing or seeing things that are not real, such as voices
  • Delusions—believing things that are not true

However, these symptoms can occur in people with other health problems, including bipolar disorder, dementia, substance abuse disorders, or brain tumors. There are several types of psychotic disorders, including Schizophrenia, etc.

  • Schizophrenia

Self-Harm

Self-harm refers to a person's harming their own body on purpose. About 5% of people hurt themselves in this way. More females hurt themselves than males. A person who self- harms usually does not mean to kill himself or herself. But they are at higher risk of attempting suicide if they do not get help. Self-harm tends to begin in teen or early adult years. Some people may engage in self-harm a few times and then stop. Others engage in it more often and have trouble stopping.
Examples of self-harm include:

  • Cutting yourself (such as using a razor blade, knife, or other sharp object to cut the skin)
  • Punching yourself or punching things (like a wall)
  • Burning yourself with cigarettes, matches, or candles
  • Pulling out your hair
  • Poking objects through body openings
  • Breaking your bones or bruising yourself

Many people cut themselves because it gives them a sense of relief. Some people use cutting as a means to cope with a problem. Some teens say that when they hurt themselves, they are trying to stop feeling lonely, angry, or hopeless.
It is possible to overcome the urge to hurt yourself. There are other ways to find relief and cope with your emotions. Counseling may help.

Suicidal Behavior

Suicide causes immeasurable pain, suffering, and loss to individuals, families, and communities nationwide. On average, nearly 130 Americans die by suicide each day, that is 1 death every 11 minutes. Suicide is the second leading cause for people ages 10-14 and 25-34 and more than 12.2 million adults in the United States had serious thoughts of suicide within the past 12 months. But suicide is preventable, so it's important to know what to do.

Post-traumatic stress disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such as war, a hurricane, rape, physical abuse or a bad accident. PTSD makes you feel stressed and afraid after the danger is over. It affects your life and the people around you.

PTSD starts at different times for different people. Signs of PTSD may start soon after a frightening event and then continue. Other people develop new or more severe signs months or even years later. PTSD can happen to anyone, even children.