How can you help

It can be challenging to know what to do if you are worried about someone. When you know there is an issue,
it is essential not to wait. Waiting and hoping they will come to you for help might lose valuable time getting them support.
Talking to someone is often the rst step when you know they are having a hard time. This way, you can nd out what is troubling them and what you can do to help.

How can you help

It can be challenging to know what to do if you are
worried about someone. When you know there is an
issue, it is essential not to wait. Waiting and hoping
they will come to you for help might lose valuable time getting them support. Talking to someone is often the
first step when you know they are having a hard time. This way, you can nd out what is troubling them and what you can do to help.

How to help

People with mental health problems sometimes experience a crisis, such as feeling suicidal or experiencing their own or a different reality.

You may also feel a sense of crisis, but staying calm is important.
There are some general strategies that you can use to help:

  • Listen without making judgements and concentrate on their needs at that moment
  • Ask them what would help them
  • Reassure and signpost to practical information or resources.
  • Avoid confrontation
  • Ask if there is someone they would like you to contact
  • Encourage them to seek appropriate professional help
  • If they have hurt themselves, make sure they get the first aid they need

Seeing, hearing or believing things that no one else does can be the symptom of a mental health problem. It can be frightening and upsetting. Gently remind the person who you are and why you are there. Don’t reinforce or dismiss their experiences; acknowledge how the symptoms make them feel.

Do's and Don't


DO Listen with an open mind

  • Let them know they’re not alone and tell them they have your unconditional love and support. Be available to listen...really listen, without judgment.

DO Ask Questions

  • They may not want to give you all the answers, but that’s okay; they’ll know you care simply because you took the time to ask.

DO Encourage them to seek help

  • It is important to remind them that mental health problems are treatable, and they don’t have to feel this way forever.

DO Help out with daily tasks

  • Any small act of kindness can really help and will be appreciated.

DO Be Patient

  • Those suffering from mental illness tend to distance themselves from their loved ones, not because they dislike your company, but because they feel like a burden.
  • Don’t pressure them to spend more time with you or to talk about their problems. As frustrating as it may be trying to help someone who does not seem to appreciate you, don’t give up on them.

DON’T Make comments such as “You’re fine” or “Cheer up”

  • Their condition is serious and likely cannot be brushed off. Try your best to make them feel comfortable and secure in sharing their emotions.

DON’T Say you know how they feel if you don’t

  • TAlthough it is nice to have someone to relate to, drawing comparisons may make them feel as if the reality of their situation is being minimized.

DON’T Question their medical decisions

  • For most people with mental health disorders, taking medicine is a big step and can be scary. Today there is still a stigma surrounding the medical treatment for these conditions. So, be patient, supportive and, most importantly, non- judgmental as your loved one finds the medication that suits their specific needs.

DON’T Pressure them to “stay busy”

  • Do not hesitate to invite them to such social events, but also don’t expect that they will accept the invitation. Whatever they may be dealing with is not easily solved by kicking back and relaxing to snap out of a bad mood.

DON’T Take it personally

  • Give them all your love and don’t expect anything in return because they may not be able to give it to you. Whether you think so or not, they need you now more than ever.

Support Group (ADSP)

ADSP (Anxiety and Depression Support Philippines) is created to reach out to strugglers of mental health condition/s like us and build a community that focuses on support, helping and understanding. We are not professionals, not associated with the government nor privately funded, we are just a Facebook-based *mental health* support group run by volunteers.

https://www.facebook.com/ADSPpage/